RENAISSANCE WAX/POLISH

Questions and tips about taking care of the weapons we collect and shoot.

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Niner
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RENAISSANCE WAX/POLISH

Postby Niner » Mon Mar 05, 2012 12:21 am

I got to reading about this stuff as a protective coating to polished brass. The idea was to slow down the normal tarnish by having a wax barrier to slow oxidation that doesn't yellow or have any detrimental chemicals. Seems this stuff could also be used on old antique guns that are used as wall hangers. It is said to have been developed for the British Museum back in the 50's. It can be bought at expensive prices. A small tube runs not much under $20. But... if it worked really good it would be worth it over the Johnson's Wax cheap alternative. It is said that a little dab will do you in treating an object which would take some of the sting out of the up front cost.


Anybody have any first hand experience using this product?

Here is a link that presents some of the claims.

http://www.fdjtool.com/downloads/instru ... ca3501.pdf
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Re: RENAISSANCE WAX/POLISH

Postby DuncaninFrance » Mon Mar 05, 2012 6:42 am

I remember when I was at sea we put a mix of log grease and mineral oil on brass to stop the salt tarnishing it. It was a sod to get off and replace........we used Vim and Vinegar that really knackered your hands up if you didn't wear gloves.
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Re: RENAISSANCE WAX/POLISH

Postby Reese Williams » Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:50 am

Niner,

I'm in Pensacola and have used the stuff for several years. Originally I used it on machined surfaces of woodworking equipment like my tablesaw and joiner. I was using RIG (Rust Inhibiting Grease) on guns and edged weapons. About two years ago I started replacing the RIG with Ren Wax on my bayonets. Most are stored in a box in my non-climate controlled garage and I haven't seen any problem yet. Put it on, let it dry and buff with an old Tee shirt. It leaves a nice smooth feel to the metal and seems to do the job. Buy the 7 oz can. You can get it on-line for about $25 and it will last a long time, it doesn't take much.
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Re: RENAISSANCE WAX/POLISH

Postby Niner » Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:58 am

Duncan, don't know what log grease is.....unless you are talking about pine sap, tung oil, maple syrup or such like.

Thanks for the response Reese about your experience. What I was thinking of doing with it relates to the brass trumpets and cornets I started collecting. All of them are "relics" if nothing else and the old flaking lacquer finish has been removed. But.. not having the skill to re-lacquer myself, and to preserve the original sound qualities, I've followed a recommendation to just wax them after polishing. I've been using Johnson's wax to some modest degree of success in slowing down the need to polish some I have in a display case. Just wondered about this Renaissance wax.
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Re: RENAISSANCE WAX/POLISH

Postby DuncaninFrance » Mon Mar 05, 2012 3:16 pm

Duncan, don't know what log grease is.....unless you are talking about pine sap, tung oil, maple syrup or such like.


In those days before GPS and all that, we used to 'stream' a log line behind the ship and it would give you the speed of the vessel.
The line was made of a plaited material such as flax.The log that was used latterly was the Walker Patent Log and it would be attached to a bracket aft so that the line could be streamed astern of the ship.
Some info here.
http://www.navis.gr/navaids/log.htm

Obviously the moving parts of the modern log needed to be lubricated and a special grease was used which protected against the salt water.
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Duncan

What contemptible scoundrel has stolen the cork to my lunch? -- W.C. Fields
"Many of those who enjoy freedom know little of its price."
You can't fix Stupid, but you can occasionally head it off before it hurts something.

http://www.twgpp.org
http://www.andrewsinfrance.co.uk
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Re: RENAISSANCE WAX/POLISH

Postby Niner » Mon Mar 05, 2012 3:58 pm

That clears it up, Duncan. But...what's in Log Grease?
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Re: RENAISSANCE WAX/POLISH

Postby DuncaninFrance » Tue Mar 06, 2012 12:04 pm

Niner wrote:That clears it up, Duncan. But...what's in Log Grease?


No Idea Robert, sorry :loco: :loco:
Duncan

What contemptible scoundrel has stolen the cork to my lunch? -- W.C. Fields
"Many of those who enjoy freedom know little of its price."
You can't fix Stupid, but you can occasionally head it off before it hurts something.

http://www.twgpp.org
http://www.andrewsinfrance.co.uk

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