Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby Niner » Tue May 18, 2010 10:20 am

So how does this play in England, Scotland, Australia, New York city, and Arizona, etc.?

Question in the newspaper for guy who does the Southern language origin and history thing.

"Why don't we pronounce the ending of 'unicycle', quadracycle' and 'motorcycle' the way we pronounce the ending of 'tricycle' and 'bicycle'?" asked the Rev. Franklin Kirksey, pastor of First Baptist Church in Spanish Fort.

Got to wondering what the other English speaking countries do with the pronunciations and if they pronounce the words the same way as we do and sometimes pronounce "cycle" to rhyme with "Michael" and sometimes to rhyme with "pickle"? The guy in the paper says the first correct pronunciation was to rhyme "cycle" with "michael".

Bicycle and tricycle rhyme with pickel by the way, and unicycle and quadracycle rhyme with Michael, and in Mobile Alabama "motorcycle" can be said correctly either way.
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby Niner Delta » Tue May 18, 2010 8:42 pm

Arizona is pretty much like the whole west coast, we really don't have an accent. We don't have a cowboy drawl like Texas or Oklahoma, or a sexy sounding southern drawl like the ladies in the south, and we don't "pahk the cah in the garahgh" like in new england states.
Motorcycle is pronounced both ways out here, guess is just depends how your parents pronounced it, and your pickle and Michael rhyming are the same out here as you are in Mobile.
Why are California and Texas the only 2 states with flags in the smilies to choose from? From all the decent states out there, why in the world would you choose them??? :roll: :roll:

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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby Niner » Tue May 18, 2010 10:31 pm

Once upon a time I found this gif flag site with small flags that could be added to the smilies section. The darn site went away and can't find it anymore. If you can find a small gif of Arizona like the ones that move... and about the same size....I'll add it. :loco:
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby joseyclosey » Wed May 19, 2010 2:14 am

In England we dont say motorsickle, but everything else is the same. Motorcycles are normally referred to as bikes here anyway , i dont think i know anyone who calls their bike a motorcycle.

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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby dromia » Thu May 20, 2010 12:42 am

I call your bike a motorcycle.
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby dromia » Thu May 20, 2010 12:45 am

Then of course there is the memorable Loudon Wainright III lyric:

"I don't want a pickle, I just want ride my motorsickle"
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby joseyclosey » Thu May 20, 2010 2:04 am

I stand corrected, there's always one! :roll:

Wainwright III ????? Whose he when he's at home?

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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby dhtaxi » Thu May 20, 2010 2:32 am

Motorbike is another word used to describe a motorcycle in the UK.
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby Aughnanure » Thu May 20, 2010 5:26 am

Down here on the real top-o-the-world those of us who speak English rhyme the lot with Michael, except sometimes 'tri' and 'bi' get 'sickel'.
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby DuncaninFrance » Thu May 20, 2010 5:53 am

Just a Moto here :FRA:
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby Niner » Thu May 20, 2010 8:31 am

I think of a "motorbike" here is one of those not powerful enough to be a motorcycle things. The wheels are smaller and usually your legs don't go around a gas tank and your feet have a kind of floor board to rest on....a motor scooter I guess would be the right word. And although not real fast, they can get you hurt or killed just as dead. I cracked a rib turning one of those things over a year or so ago.
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby Fletch » Thu May 27, 2010 9:52 am

We use the term Bike here in RSA. Tri and Bi are concluded with cycle ryming with pickle.
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby tonsper again » Mon Aug 30, 2010 1:18 pm

Hello again. I grew up thinking that I had no accent since I had lived in many places and in three countries. An experience a few years ago cured me of this. I was employed by the Bahamian government and appeared one day as a witness in their Supreme court in Nassau. I thought that I speaking quite clearly but the court clerk, who was trying to type what I said, politely interrupted to say in very clear Bahamian " Please slow down, I am having difficulty understanding your accent." This was re-confirmed the following year on a trip through the US mid-west at a highway construction site. The woman holding the marker to stop traffic said "Y'alls gotta be fum summwhers ailse cuz ah caayunt unnerstan whut yuz saays."

"Argue with an idiot and he will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience"

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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby Niner » Mon Aug 30, 2010 10:32 pm

Funny you say that Tonsper.....I know I don't have any accent. Now everybody else who comes from someplace else sure talks strange. Try the chat on Sundays sometime. It's quite obvious there.

It is also funny how we over time get used to other peoples way of talking and that we get to where we understand them even though it isn't the way we speak ourselves and we really don't take much notice after long experience. I was watching a PBS show last night about an architect from Auburn University that started a project to build houses for rural poor people as a teaching experience for his students. One of the people they were building for was an old black man who when he was on camera the producer of the show put in sub titles what he said so people who wouldn't otherwise be able to follow the diolect could understand what he was saying. But for me, because of my experiences and long time location in this part of the country there was no need and seemed really strange that they did it. However, I'm sure it was probably necessary to understand what the man was saying for some people that didn't otherwise connect with the way the words were used and pronounced.
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby DuncaninFrance » Tue Aug 31, 2010 3:00 am

SELF EXPLANATORY :AUS:
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What contemptible scoundrel has stolen the cork to my lunch? -- W.C. Fields
"Many of those who enjoy freedom know little of its price."
You can't fix Stupid, but you can occasionally head it off before it hurts something.

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http://www.andrewsinfrance.co.uk
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby Aughnanure » Tue Aug 31, 2010 4:11 am

That ain't me ;)
Self Defence is not only a Right, it is an Obligation.



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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby DuncaninFrance » Fri Sep 10, 2010 8:48 am

Australian Citizenship Test. :AUS:

The Australian citizenship test has been designed to assist people who want to become
Australian citizens gain an understanding of Australia’s values, traditions, history and national
symbols.
The test is an important part of ensuring that migrants have the capacity to fully participate in
the Australian community as citizens and maximise the opportunities available to them in
Australia. It will promote social cohesion and successful integration into the community.
Test Rules
There are some basic rules which you must follow during the test:
- Test is timed - You will be allowed 45 minutes to complete the test (or 90 minutes in
the case of an assisted test). No additional time will be made available.
- This is a closed book test - You must not bring any test resource material into the testing
centre (this includes note paper, the Becoming an Australian Citizen resource book,
study notes, etc).
- Personal belongings may be taken into the test site however these must be stored under
the desk for the duration of the test. Mobile phones and all other electronic
communication/gaming equipment should be switched off while you are within the test
centre.
If you do not follow these rules, you may be asked to leave the test centre and may have to sit
the test again.
Test Questions
You may begin writing only once you are advised to do so by the test supervisor.
(1) Do you understand the meaning, but are unable to explain the origin, of the term
“died in the arse”? Explain the meaning:

(2) What is a “bloody little beauty”?

(3) Are these terms related: chuck a sickie; chuck a spaz; chuck a U-ey?
Yes / No

TURN TO PAGE 2

2 CONFIDENTIAL
(4) Explain the following passage:
In the arvo last Chrissy the relos rocked up for a Barbie, some bevvies and a few
snags. After a bit of a Bex and a lie down we opened the pressies, scoffed all the
chockies, bickies and lollies. Then we drained a few tinnies and Mum did her block
after Dad and Steve had a Barney and a bit of biffo.

(5) Macca, Chooka and Wanger are driving to Surfers in their Torana. If they are
travelling at 100 km/h while listening to Barnsey, Farnsey and Acca Dacca, how
many slabs will each person on average consume between flashing a brown eye
and taking a slash?

(6) Complete the following sentences:
(a) If the van's rockin' don't bother ________________________________
(b) You're going home in the back of a _____________________________
(c) Fair crack of the ________________________________________
(7) I've had a gutful and I can't be farked. Discuss

(8) Have you ever been on the giving or receiving end of a wedgie?
Yes / No

(9) Do you have a friend or relative who has a car in their front yard "up on blocks"?
Is his name Bruce and does he have a wife called Cheryl?
Yes / No

(10) Do you or your family regularly eat a dish involving mincemeat, cabbage, curry
powder and a packet of chicken noodle soup called either chow mein, chop suey
or Kai see Ming?
Yes / No

TURN TO PAGE 3
3 CONFIDENTIAL
(11) What are the ingredients in a rissole?

(12) Describe the correct procedure for eating a Tim Tam.

(13) Do you have an Aunty Irene who smokes 30 cigarettes a day and sounds like a
bloke?
Yes / No

(14) In any two-hour period have you ever eaten three-bean salad, a chop and two
serves of pav washed down with someone else's beer that has been flogged from a
bath full of ice?
Yes / No

(15) When you go to a bring-your-own-meat Barbie can you eat other people's meat or
are you only allowed to eat your own?

(16) What purple root vegetable beginning with the letter "b" is required by law to be
included in a hamburger with the lot?

(17) Do you own or have you ever owned a lawn mower, a pair of thongs, an Esky or
Ugg boots?
Yes / No

(18) Is it possible to prang a car while doing circle work?
Yes / No

(19) Who would you like to crack on to?

(20) Who is the most Australian (pick one answer):
(a) Kevin "Bloody" Wilson
(b) John "True Blue" Williamson
(c) Kylie Minogue
(d) Warnie

TURN TO PAGE 4
4 CONFIDENTIAL
(21) Is there someone you are only mates with because they own a trailer or have a
pool?
Yes / No

(22) What do the phrases “sinkin piss at a mates joint” and “gettin paraletic” mean?

Please submit this paper back to the test supervisor when you have had a fair crack.
Duncan

What contemptible scoundrel has stolen the cork to my lunch? -- W.C. Fields
"Many of those who enjoy freedom know little of its price."
You can't fix Stupid, but you can occasionally head it off before it hurts something.

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http://www.andrewsinfrance.co.uk
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby DocAV » Sat Jan 01, 2011 1:05 am

Directly...Royal Naval term...used mostly in late 1700s and early 1800s
"The Lords of the Admiralty Command and Direct you to proceed to HMS Bellerophon at Portsmpouth and take command of her etc"
i.e., ASAP, right now, immediately etc.

Also on board ship, message from captain's cabin to quarter-deck..."The captain will be up directly" ( ie, get snappy, he'll be here any minute.).

From the Latin, "De Rectus"-- by a straight rule or line, as the crow flies ( de via recta); by the quickest possible route....


Cockney slang...d'reckly....

Regards,
Doc AV...a non-Anglo-Celtic Aussie.
Romanum-Celtae sum, sed ex Gallia Cisalpina venit. Vae Celtae iberniorum et britannicorum., et ulteriores barbarorum.

Brisbane Australia.
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby The Virginian » Mon Mar 21, 2011 3:22 pm

Y'all should have one for the South in the USA and one for our Cannuck friends to the North as well as all those different Yankees!
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby Niner » Wed Jul 20, 2011 9:14 pm

I was watching the news. David Cameron, the Prime Minister in the UK was babbling on about that Australian, British, now American, citizen-scumbag- mega- bucks Rupert Murdock and how he and Murdock were just friends. And he got to saying something about what he had "learnt". That's a word usage that is different in the US. Americans generally never say learnt....they say "learned" when they are talking about something after the time that they acquired knowledge of it.

I noticed it on one of those Brit detective mystery show imports on PBS the other night too. Wonder why this is that the usage is different?
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby DuncaninFrance » Thu Jul 21, 2011 3:39 am

From the Oxford English Dictionary...................

learn
n verb (past and past participle learned or chiefly British learnt)
1 acquire knowledge of or skill in (something) through study or experience or by being taught. Øcommit to memory. Øbecome aware of by information or from observation.
2 archaic or dialect teach.

DERIVATIVES
learnability noun
learnable adjective
learner noun

ORIGIN
Old English leornian, of West Germanic origin; related to lore1.

learned
n adjective having or characterized by much knowledge or erudition.

DERIVATIVES
learnedly adverb
learnedness noun

Might clear it up a bit Robert :cool:
Duncan

What contemptible scoundrel has stolen the cork to my lunch? -- W.C. Fields
"Many of those who enjoy freedom know little of its price."
You can't fix Stupid, but you can occasionally head it off before it hurts something.

http://www.twgpp.org
http://www.andrewsinfrance.co.uk
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby Niner » Thu Jul 21, 2011 5:38 am

That tells the origins alright.....back before the fork in the road. Just wonder what was the fork and why was it in the road? :bigsmile:
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby DuncaninFrance » Thu Jul 21, 2011 7:37 am

That is the "two nations separated by a single language" answer :bigsmile:
Duncan

What contemptible scoundrel has stolen the cork to my lunch? -- W.C. Fields
"Many of those who enjoy freedom know little of its price."
You can't fix Stupid, but you can occasionally head it off before it hurts something.

http://www.twgpp.org
http://www.andrewsinfrance.co.uk
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby deadin » Fri Oct 07, 2011 10:17 am

I just found this thread and enjoyed it (Especially the bits about accents)
A good example would be my youngest son, born in Japan while we were stationed there. ( career US Navy)
Transferred to Texas about the time he was learning to talk. Then to Virginia where he went to kindergarten and pre-school and, finally to Seattle where he started 1st Grade.
We were called in by his teacher who wanted to know if we were seeing a therapist as our son had a speech impediment.... :lol:
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby DuncaninFrance » Fri Oct 07, 2011 1:52 pm

AW SHI! :loco:
Duncan

What contemptible scoundrel has stolen the cork to my lunch? -- W.C. Fields
"Many of those who enjoy freedom know little of its price."
You can't fix Stupid, but you can occasionally head it off before it hurts something.

http://www.twgpp.org
http://www.andrewsinfrance.co.uk
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Re: Anglo / American / Australian Translator.

Postby Aughnanure » Fri Oct 07, 2011 4:46 pm

Learnt/learned; seems that the US is still a repository of original English.
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